Soil Poems

Read Poems About the Soil From People All Over the World

Roses are red
Violets are blue
I like soil.
How about you?

...is an example of a soil poem. A lot people are moved to write poetry about subjects they care for or respect. Well, here are some poems from people who care about the soil. Some are cinquains that were written by third graders from Cape May City Elementary School in Cape May, New Jersey.

Nicole Cinquain: Soil

Soil
Wet, Dry
It gives shelter
Rocky, Hard
Clay

Prairie dog

Nicole is a third grader at a Cape May, New Jersey elementary school.

Quick question: This animal "digs" living in the soil. What kind of animal is she? If you know, email Izolda Trakhtenberg at the address below.

Christine's Cinquain: Soil

Soil
Brown, Rocky
It grows food
Soft, Squeaky
Humus
grapes

Quick question: In her poem, Christine mentions that humus has a sound, squeaky. What other sounds does soil make? Does a sand sound the same as a clay? If you know or have any ideas, email Izolda Trakhtenberg at the address below.

Christine is a third grader at a Cape May, New Jersey elementary school.

Image provided courtesy of: Agricultural Research Service Information Staff.

Brad's Cinquain: Soil

Soil
Rocky, Tan
It helps plants
Rough, Cold
Sand

German flowers

Quick question: In his poem, Brad says that soil helps plants. Can you think of some of the ways that soil helps plants? If you have any ideas, email Izolda Trakhtenberg at the address below.

Brad is a third grader at a Cape May, New Jersey elementary school.

Denise's Cinquain: Soil

Soil
Dry, Cold
Good for plants
Brown, Rooty
Loam

blueberry blossoms

Quick question: In her poem, Denise says that soil is good for plants. Can you think of some of the ways that soil is good for plants? For example, one of the ways in which soil is good for plants is that it provides a place for the roots of plants to grow. If you have any other ideas, email Izolda Trakhtenberg at the address below. By the way, not that you can tell from the color of the flowers, but this is a picture of a blueberry plant.

Denise is a third grader at a Cape May, New Jersey elementary school.

Image provided courtesy of: Agricultural Research Service Information Staff.

Jason's Cinquain: Soil

Soil
Reddish,Rocky
Can make sculptures
Rough, Dusty
Clay

Urns

Quick question: In his poem, Jason mentions that soil can be used to make sculptures. What other art forms can the soil be used in? If you know or have any ideas, email us at: globe@ltpmail.gsfc.nasa.gov.

Jason is a third grader at a Cape May, New Jersey elementary school.

Photograph © 1997 Wild Moon Studios

Soil
Dry, Soft
Plants live there
Black, Rocky
Humus

White flower

Quick question: In the poem above, Shawn says that plants live in the soil. Can you think of other things or beings that live in the soil? If so, what kind? If you have any other ideas, email Izolda Trakhtenberg at the address below.

Shawn is a third grader at a Cape May, New Jersey elementary school.

Photograph © 1997 Wild Moon Studios

Other Poems:

The Little Shovel

by Rich and Will of Richard M. Teitelman school in Cape May, New Jersey

There once was a shovel named Rifty who found digging pits a bit nifty
But one day when the weather was ify he went outside and found his friend Jiffy
And by standing in the cold their noses became snifly.
Now stuck in his shed with ice on his head he puts his socks on but 10 to 1 says he'd rather dig a,o,b,r horizons.
So stuck in doors he calls his friend Tucker to do him a favor and find the soil structure.

UFL soil

Quick question: In the poem, the Little Shovel asks his friend Tucker to find the soil structure. Can you name the different types of soil structure and what they look like? If you have any ideas, email Izolda Trakhtenberg at the address below.

Rich and Will are eighth graders from Richard M. Teitelman school in Cape May, New Jersey.

Photograph courtesy of the University of Florida

Submitted: December 1998

Sand: a Cinquain by Jessica and Caitlin

Sand

Scratches you

Blows into eyes

It moves on ground

Hard

 

sunset on Crete

Quick question: In their poem, Jessica and Caitlin say that sand is hard. Do you know what kind of material sand is made from? If you have any other ideas, email Izolda Trakhtenberg at the address below. This is a sunset on the Isle of Crete and there's a lot of sand on this beach.

By Jessica and Caitlin

Image provided courtesy of: Izolda Trakhtenberg

Submitted: November 2001

Asparaguses

Oh, I just love asparaguses
They're so delicious-and
My Mother says it's quite polite
To take them in your hand.

I make believe that they are fish
And lift them, dripping wet
Way in the air, then drop them down
Into my waiting net.

I bite the heads off first, and then
I eat the bodies, too,
But the tails you're not supposed to eat
'Cause they're not quite cooked thru!

And when I'm finished with my food
And eaten all my fish
There's nothing left but just a row
Of tails upon the dish.

 

Photographs © 1997 Visual Taste
Poem by Sylvia Schwarz from, A Window Box of Verse, copyright: Sam Gabriel Sons & Company, New York

 

Asparagus
another photo of asparagus
 

The Surprise

We raked the leaves from the garden bed,
Daddy and I,
And what do you think we found under them?
Little bunches of straight green stem ! That s what we found in the garden bed,
Daddy and I.

And one of the stems had a fat little head!
And what do you think my Daddy said?
He said it would grow fatter still,
And soon we'd find a daffodil
Nodding there instead.
That's really what my Daddy said
When we raked the leaves from the garden bed.

Photograph © 1997 Wild Moon Studios

Poem by Sylvia W. Schwarz, from A Window Box of Verse, copyright Sam Gabriel Sons & Company, New York.

daffodils  
 

 

Calling all soil fans!!! If you have soil poems, stories, pictures, photos or songs that you would like to see published on this web page, please submit them to Izolda Trakhtenberg at the email address below.